How prenatal aspirin brings health equity

Preeclampsia, a hypertensive condition of pregnancy, is the leading cause of maternal death and preterm births in the United States. While hospitals have developed ways to evaluate and treat preeclampsia, it is still a scary diagnosis for any mother to receive during her pregnancy. Sadly, preeclampsia and its associated complications (preterm birth, growth restriction) disproportionately affect women of color, particularly non-Hispanic black women. In recent years, prominent black women have opened up to share their traumatic birth stories and raise awareness about this health disparity. Beyonce spent weeks…

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Lilly MarcelinComment
Introducing Alliance for Healthy Tomorrow and Safer States

Information about toxic chemicals and reproductive health is not readily available to women of color, especially for those in low income communities. Products like hair straighteners and relaxers are heavily marketed to black and ethnic women. Yet, many women of African descent are less likely to have information about the health risks from the exposure to products that contain hormone disruptors, heavy metals, and other known carcinogens.  Many of the chemicals found in common hair products for people of African descent are known as estrogen and endocrine-disrupting chemicals or EDCs.

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Lilly MarcelinComment
The Fight of Our Foremothers

During the 1840s in Montgomery, Alabama, Dr. James Marion Sims, long lauded as “the father of modern gynecology” by the medical establishment, exercised inhumane and unethical conduct through his experiments on nearly a dozen black women, three of whom he bought – known to us only as Anarcha, Betsey, and Lucy…

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Lilly MarcelinComment
Spotlight on Black Maternal Health

In recent years, the media has been saturated with reports of racial inequities in reproductive health outcomes. The truth is, these disparities have persisted for decades and the outcomes we’re seeing now are largely tied to the legacy of racism and sexism that persists in the United States and many other places in the world.  In my opinion, hearing repeat statistics layered with the similar justifications is tiresome and feels overwhelming.

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Lilly MarcelinComment
Introducing BARCC

At your last doctor’s visit, did anyone ask if you were “safe at home?” Most of us can find this question confusing or uncomfortable. However, this question is asked by medical providers to assess who might be at risk for sexual or intimate partner violence in order to connect survivors to the appropriate resources.

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Lilly Marcelin
Fertility Preservation

What if I had the choice?

Fertility and motherhood have long been revered in most societies—but what if this choice becomes difficult upon receiving a breast cancer diagnosis?

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Lilly Marcelin
Let's Talk BRCA

The rate of BRCA testing increased after Angelina Jolie’s article in Time Magazine in 2013, which some labeled the Angelina Effect; however, the disparity among those who should be tested and the groups who are tested needs to be addressed.

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Lilly Marcelin